News

Forests ‘held their breath’ during global warming hiatus, research shows

Global forest ecosystems, widely considered to act as the lungs of the planet, ‘held their breath’ during the most recent occurrence of a warming hiatus, new research has shown.

Intensive animal production may boost flu pandemic threat

Mass livestock production is driving molecular changes in diseases that could lead to human pandemics, according to an expert from the University of Exeter.

Fungal biology research award 2016

Professor Nick Talbot FRS was awarded the Fungal Biology Research Award 2016 by the British Mycological Society. The award was made in recognition of his outstanding original contributions to fungal biology research.

Production of seedless fruits an under-estimated tool for improving food security, research shows

The opportunity to produce bountiful levels of vital food crops such as apples, tomatoes and watermelons could be boosted by reducing a crop’s demand for pollinators, new research has shown.

The Prince of Wales praises work of University of Exeter farming experts

The Prince of Wales has praised the work of University of Exeter experts to help support small family farms.

Take advantage of evolution in malaria fight, scientists say

Scientists could harness the power of evolution to stop mosquitoes spreading malaria, according to new research by the University of Exeter and the University of California, Berkeley.

Experts embark on project to save the world from “bananageddon”

Experts are hoping to stop the UK’s favourite fruit, the banana, from disappearing from our shops.

Exeter expert urges scrutiny of genome editing

New methods of genome editing which could increase food production rates in farmed animals require urgent ethical scrutiny, according to a University of Exeter expert.

Coastal wildlife more vulnerable to microplastics than expected

Coastal dwelling marine wildlife, including crabs, lobsters and shellfish, which play a crucial role in the food chain, are more vulnerable to harmful plastic pollution than previously expected.

Seek and you shall find – bees remain excellent searchers even when ill

Honeybees are hardwired to efficiently search the landscape enabling them to continue working for the greater good of their hives even when they are sick, according to new research.

African fishers undertake highly risky expeditions to make a living

Fishers in Central Africa often cover hundreds of miles in very basic boats without engines searching for food to feed their families and make a living, a new study shows.

Exeter geographers use games to show festival goers the importance of water management

Revellers at Green Man Festival explored the importance of water and land use management by using a range of games and information boards.

Biological invasions threaten biodiversity, economy and human livelihood in developing countries

Invasions from alien species threaten the economies and livelihoods of residents of some of the world’s poorest nations.

Humble moss helped create our oxygen-rich atmosphere

The evolution of the first land plants including mosses may explain a long-standing mystery of how Earth’s atmosphere became enriched with oxygen.

Did you experience drought of ‘76?

Researchers are urging people who experienced the 1976 drought to share their stories of how they coped during the most severe water shortage in living memory.

High chance that current atmospheric greenhouse concentrations commit to warmings greater than 1.5 °C

Current levels of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations warm air temperatures overland by over 1.5°C.

Acting together can reduce the risks climate change poses to the UK

The independent Committee on Climate Change today concludes that the impacts of climate change are already being felt in the UK, and urgent action is required to address climate-related risks. 

Major study reveals steep decline in number of small family farms

A major new independent study commissioned by The Prince’s Countryside Fund into the future of small family farms across the UK, has revealed a steep decline in numbers since the beginning of the century.

Experts listen in on noisy Falmouth seas

A long-term plan for managing noise in shallow parts of the ocean such as Falmouth Bay is needed to protect the environment, scientists have said.

Be wary of knotweed advice on the web, researchers warn

Gardeners turning to the internet for advice about Japanese knotweed are likely to find a wide range of potentially misleading advice.

Victims of flooding frustrated by Government support

Victims need clearer information on what they can expect in the aftermath of major flooding from the government and other authorities, new University of Exeter research shows.

Night-time light pollution causes Spring to come early

Human use of artificial light is causing Spring to come at least a week early in the UK.

New research shows South West farmers concerned by Brexit

Farmers have expressed concern about the unknown implications of Britain leaving the European Union, according to a new survey by experts at the University of Exeter.

New £1M facility to reveal the secrets of marine microbial communities one member at a time

University of Exeter and Plymouth Marine Laboratory have unveiled a state of the art facility for the study of environmental microbes.

Exeter marine plastics expert to advise parliamentary select committee

A University of Exeter expert on marine pollution will be giving advice to a cross-party committee of MPs at the Palace of Westminster in London today (Monday).

Exeter Engineering student wins top prize for wave energy research

A University of Exeter Renewable Energy doctoral student focusing on wave energy has claimed first prize and £1,200 at an international conference.

Researchers find significant greening on Earth

There has been an increase in leaves on plants and trees on the Earth equivalent in area to two times the continental USA, a new study shows.

Divers and researchers help protect UK reef habitats

Divers and experts are calling for more action to protect biodiversity-rich UK rocky reefs for the future.

North Atlantic played pivotal role in last great climate tipping point, research shows

The North Atlantic Ocean played a key role in the last great tipping point in Earth’s climate system, pioneering new research has shown.

Changes to environment helps protect young pheasants

Making changes to the early lives of young pheasants can help prevent them dying needlessly, University of Exeter researchers have found.

Risk of multiple tipping points should be triggering urgent global action on climate change

To avoid multiple climate tipping points, policy makers need to act now to stop global CO2 emissions by 2050.

‘Intelligent’ robotic boat piloted by Exeter researchers makes maiden voyage

Researchers from the University of Exeter will be launching a boat with its own intelligence off the Scottish coast this week to test their pioneering software design that could revolutionise data collection at sea.

Global farming practices must change, say climate change researchers

Human activities such as farming have caused the world’s plants, animals and microbes to contribute to global warming, a major international study co- authored by a University of Exeter professor has found.

Exeter experts receive €700,000 grant to study the future security of water, food and energy provision

Researchers from the University of Exeter are leading a pioneering international research project to deliver new guidance for governments to safeguard long-term provision of crucial natural resources.

Exeter Expert outlines global water engineering research success

New technology developed by University of Exeter academics to detect water leaks has helped more than seven million people, according to a water expert.

Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage

The rate that fish are captured by predators can double when boats are motoring nearby, according to pioneering work led by a University of Exeter marine biologist.

Bee virus spread manmade and emanates from Europe

The spread of a disease that is decimating global bee populations is manmade, and driven by European honeybee populations, new research has concluded.

Stress in fish from noise may be short-lived, new research shows

Two commercially important fish species can rapidly recover from stress attributed to short-term exposure to man-made underwater noise pollution, new research has shown.

Rewilding, wellbeing and return of lynx in spotlight at Exeter

Rewilding the United Kingdom – from restored forests to the return of predators such as the lynx – were in the spotlight at a topical lecture. 

Crowd-funding launched to research and protect Dartmoor wildlife

A new crowd-funding initiative has been launched by a University of Exeter PhD researcher in a bid to secure backing to help expand their bird conservation research.

Land management could help wildlife beat the challenges brought by climate change

The harmful effects of climate change on wildlife habitats can been counteracted by localised land management, a new research paper has suggested.

£2M grant to reduce major aquaculture diseases

The University of Exeter and the Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Sciences (Cefas) are leading on a £1.97M BBSRC-Newton Fund project.

Changing the use of agricultural land could massively reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Making farmland more productive could bring about significant reductions in the UK’s greenhouse gas emissions, University of Exeter research has found.

Science for managing climate change risks across Europe under the microscope

An exploration into how science can manage climate change risks across Europe will be presented by an expert from the University of Exeter at the world’s largest climate change talks.

Cultural heritage “crucial” to climate change debate

An exploration of the relationship between cultural heritage and climate change is being led by an expert from the University of Exeter at the world’s largest ever climate change talks.

‘Fish fraud’ across Europe in decline, study shows

Tough new policies to combat fish fraud across Europe appear to be working, according to a new study.

Half of all Amazonian tree species may be globally threatened

More than half of all tree species in the world’s most diverse forest may be globally threatened, according to a new study.

Early farmers exploited beehive products at least 8,500 years ago

Humans have been exploiting bees as far back as the Stone Age, according to new collaborative research involving the University of Exeter that is published in Nature today.

Exeter lead pioneering research into elements crucial for low carbon technologies

The University of Exeter has received high-level funding for crucial research into accessing essential elements needed for a variety of environmental technologies.

Intensive farming link to bovine TB

Intensive farming practices have been linked to higher risk of bovine TB, new research has concluded.

Exeter scientists receive the latest NERC funding for strategic research

University of Exeter researchers are pleased to be among the recipients of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) highlight topics grants – one of the new ways in which NERC is funding strategic research.

Manage family farms like football clubs to survive in tough world market

Exeter researcher Prof Lobley calls farmers to learn from football clubs

Cacti among world’s most threatened species

Thirty-one percent of cactus species are threatened with extinction.

University of Exeter joins consortium in major research grant for Cornwall and the South West

Experts from the University of Exeter are part of a consortium that has been awarded funding for a £3m research project from Innovate UK and BBSRC.

Can food affect your mood? Researchers call for participants to take part in MoodFood trial

Researchers from the University of Exeter are seeking participants for a trial into whether certain types of food could prevent depression. 

Offshore wind farms could be more risky for gannets than previously thought, study shows

Offshore wind farms which are to be built in waters around the UK could pose a greater threat to protected populations of gannets than previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at the universities of Leeds, Exeter and Glasgow.

Ocean circulation rethink solves climate conundrum

Researchers from the University of Exeter believe they have solved one of the biggest puzzles in climate science. 

University of Exeter contributes to new underwater noise monitoring network

Underwater noise in the marine environment is the focus of a new UK-wide research partnership.

Satellite technology puts ‘mussel’ into shellfish monitoring

University of Exeter researchers are working with a team of UK scientists to explore the use of satellites and meteorological data to monitor and forecast water quality 

Urgent research needed on predicting future regional climate change, report demands

Crucial research into the changing spatial patterns of future climate patterns is urgently needed, a new review article has concluded.

Sediment dwelling creatures at risk from nanoparticles in common household products

Researchers from the University of Exeter highlight the risk that engineered nanoparticles released from masonry paint on exterior facades, and consumer products such as zinc oxide cream, could have on aquatic creatures.

Severe droughts could lead to widespread losses of butterflies by 2050

Widespread drought-sensitive butterfly population extinctions could occur in the UK as early as 2050 according to a new study.

Crop pests outwit climate change predictions en route to new destinations

Researchers highlight the dangers of relying on climate-based projections of future crop pest distributions.

Future looks gloomy for Robben Island penguins

Fish feast boosts penguin numbers.

Exeter bioscientist awarded prestigious European Research Council Consolidator Grant

Dr Ivana Gudelj from Biosciences has been awarded a European Research Council (ERC) Consolidator Grant worth €2 million over the next 5 years.

Scientists warn of species loss due to man-made landscapes

Study found 35% fewer bird species in agricultural habitats.

Devon pupils lead citizen science on plastic

Young people will take part in a unique outreach project in which they will lead and participate in a scientific research project on chemicals in plastic food packaging.

Pesticide study shows that sexual conflict can maintain genetic variation

New research from the University of Exeter has shown that the sexually antagonistic gene for resistance to the pesticide DDT helps to maintain genetic variation. 

Report lays bare public priorities for the natural environment

Public views on the challenges facing policy and decision makers to manage the natural environment have been revealed in a major national public dialogue project.

Exeter researchers lead international initiative to face devastating crop disease

Exeter researchers lead international initiative to face devastating crop disease 

Grant of £885,000 to fund important food crop research

A Physicist at the University of Exeter has received a substantial grant to help improve the sustainability of commercially valuable crops.

New project to help farmers plan succession

A new initiative to help farmers effectively plan who will take over their farms is being announced at the Royal Cornwall Show on 5 June. The University of Exeter’s Centre for Rural Policy in partnership with NFU Mutual, a leading rural insurer, and Cornwall’s Rural Business School have developed the first UK-wide academic study of succession farming. 

Ecosystem management that ignores ‘taboo tradeoffs’ is likely to fail

Research published today recommends a new approach to the difficult tradeoffs that environmental managers face when choosing between environmental sustainability and profitability. 

Mining pollution alters fish genetics in south west England

Pollution from historic mining activities in south west England has led to a reduction in genetic diversity of brown trout.

Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide makes trees use water more efficiently

The increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration has allowed trees across Europe to use their available water resources more efficiently, new research has shown.

Grant success for University of Exeter researchers at Cornwall’s Wave Hub

University of Exeter researchers are part of the biodiversity research team of a new EUR 17 million EU Horizon 2020 funded project 

Coastal light pollution disturbs marine animals, new study shows

Marine ecosystems can be changed by night-time artificial lighting according to new research.

One percent of tree species in the Amazon forest account for half of its carbon

A new study published in the journal Nature Communications has discovered that fewer than 200 species of Amazonian tree, barely 1%, are responsible for half of all tree growth and carbon stored in the Amazon.

New study shows parrotfish are critical to coral reef island building

Parrotfish, commonly found on healthy coral reefs, can also play a pivotal role in providing the sands necessary to build and maintain coral reef islands.

New Zealand stoats provide an ark for genetic diversity

Extinct British genes have been preserved in the stoat population of New Zealand, a new study has found.

Warming seas pose habitat risk for fishy favourites

Popular North Sea fish such as haddock, plaice and lemon sole could become less common on our menus because they will be constrained to preferred habitat as seas warm.

Scientists describe a new alga that may help corals adapt to climate change

Changes in ocean chemistry associated with climate change are exacerbating the global decline of coral reefs.

Biodiversity damage mapped by global land-use study

Humanity’s use of land for agricultural production has come at a cost to local ecosystems worldwide, but some of the damage can be reversed.

Biodiversity damage mapped by global land-use study

Humanity’s use of land for agricultural production has come at a cost to local ecosystems worldwide, but some of the damage can be reversed.

England's treasured landscapes to benefit from new partnership

A pioneering partnership is being launched to care for some of England’s most beautiful and vulnerable high ground. The Uplands Alliance (UA) brings together for the first time practitioners, researchers and policy makers with interests in the highest areas of land, including treasured landscapes of the Lake District, Yorkshire Dales and Dartmoor.

England's treasured landscapes to benefit from new partnership

A pioneering partnership is being launched to care for some of England’s most beautiful and vulnerable high ground. The Uplands Alliance (UA) brings together for the first time practitioners, researchers and policy makers with interests in the highest areas of land, including treasured landscapes of the Lake District, Yorkshire Dales and Dartmoor.

University of Bristol pledges commitment to sustainable ruminant production

The Vice-Chancellor of the University of Bristol, Professor Sir Eric Thomas, officially signed the Global Farm Platform Statement of Intent on Tuesday 10 February 2015.

First direct evidence that drought-weakened Amazonian forests ‘inhale less carbon’

For the first time, an international research team, including a tropical forest ecologist from the University of Exeter, has provided direct evidence of the rate at which individual trees in the Amazon Basin ‘inhale’ carbon from the atmosphere during a severe drought. 

‘No take zones’ in English Channel would benefit marine wildlife and the fishing industry

Marine conservationists are increasingly pinning their hopes on marine protected areas (MPAs) to save threatened species and reduce over-fishing.

‘No take zones’ in English Channel would benefit marine wildlife and the fishing industry

Marine conservationists are increasingly pinning their hopes on marine protected areas (MPAs) to save threatened species and reduce over-fishing.

Study seeks to understand variations in the rate of global warming

A new study has looked at slow-downs in the rate of global surface warming, despite ongoing increases in the emissions of greenhouse gases.

Algae aid corals in their fight against climate change

Corals may be better equipped to tolerate climate change than previously believed, according to research led by the University of Exeter.

New research finds rivers can be a source of antibiotic resistance

 Rivers and streams could be a major source of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

Study seeks to understand Amazonia's past to ensure its sustainable future

A new international project led by the University of Exeter will investigate the Amazon’s sustainable future by studying the way that ancient societies used and transformed the environment.

Exeter team to monitor impact of wild beavers on our waterways

A team at the University of Exeter is to study England’s only breeding population of wild beavers in order to understand their impact on pollution, flooding and water quality after an announcement yesterday.

Research pinpoints new technique for producing cheaper solar energy

Pioneering new research could pave the way for solar energy to be converted into household electricity more cheaply than ever before.

Wild pollinators at risk from diseased commercial species of bee

A new study from the University of Exeter has found that viruses carried by commercial bees can jump to wild pollinator populations with potentially devastating effects. 

Plastic pollution threatens one of the ocean’s key inhabitants

Microscopic plastic pollution, which is present throughout the world’s seas, could affect the feeding habits of one of the ocean’s key inhabitants.

Mother plants teach seeds about seasons and give them a thicker coat when it's cold

New research from the University of Exeter and the John Innes Centre has found that 'mother' plants remember the seasons and use this memory to teach their seeds the time of year and tell them when they should germinate. 

Attitudes to climate change depend on people’s sense of belonging to the planet

New research led by the University of Exeter has found that people who have a stronger sense of place at the global than the national level are more likely to accept that climate change is caused by human activities. 

Study finds early warning signals of abrupt climate change

A new study by researchers at the University of Exeter has found early warning signals of a reorganisation of the Atlantic oceans’ circulation which could have a profound impact on the global climate system.

Researchers to use algae to clean up mine water

A ground breaking research project aims to clean up water from a Cornish tin mine, using algae to harvest the precious heavy metals and produce biofuel.

Drugs in the environment affect plant growth

The drugs we release into the environment are likely to have a significant impact on plant growth, finds a new study led by the University of Exeter Medical School and Plymouth University.

Reports identify areas where wildlife can survive in a changing climate

The University of Exeter has worked with Natural England on a project that helps to target conservation action.

University of Exeter research contributes to establishment of first Marine Protected Area Network in Central Africa

Government of Gabon announces the decision to create a New Marine Protected Area Network  - covering about 23 percent of Gabon's territorial waters and EEZ (Exclusive Economic Zone)

New research examines shellfish consumption

A pioneering Cornish research partnership is providing invaluable information to the UK’s shellfish industry by improving understanding of what seafood people choose to eat and why.

New laws threaten Brazil's unique ecosystems

Brazil's globally significant ecosystems could be exposed to mining and dams if proposals currently being debated by the Brazilian Congress go ahead, according to research co-authored by an Exeter academic published today in the journal Science.  

Exeter researchers investigate how oceans store greenhouse gas

A team from the University’s new ‘Exeter atmospheric and ocean sciences’ unit joined a research cruise earlier this year to investigate the change in storage of greenhouse gases in the waters of the North Atlantic Basin. 

Bioscience researchers awarded Darwin Initiative grant.

University of Exeter researchers have been awarded a two-year grant to promote the conservation of threatened marine animals.

Rising ocean acidity threatens sea life

Researchers in Exeter have found that sea creatures will be affected by rising ocean acidity.

Coastal living boosts physical activity - but only in the West

People who live close to the coast are more likely to meet physical activity guidelines than inland dwellers, finds a new study released today.

Air pollution increases river-flows

A study published in Nature Geoscience shows that air pollution has had a significant impact on the amount of water flowing through many rivers in the northern hemisphere.

Research paves way for new generation of fungicides

Research by the University of Exeter has provided novel insight into the mechanism by which pathogenic fungi avoid the immune responses of the plants they attack.

Major funding announced for bioscience students

The South West Doctoral Training Partnership (SWDTP) is to receive substantial new funding from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) for the training and development of bioscience PhD students.

Launch of Defra’s Sustainable Intensification Research

A series of projects to investigate ways to increase farm productivity while reducing negative environmental impacts (sustainable intensification) will receive £4.5 million from Defra. 

New study charts the global invasion of crop pests

Many of the world’s most important crop-producing countries will be fully saturated with pests by the middle of the century if current trends continue, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.

Cornish residents sought for study into environmental risks

Scientists at the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus are seeking members of the public to help conduct research into how certain plants, animals and other environmental factors in and around homes are perceived by Cornish residents.

Cornish winemakers could benefit from climate change study

The UK’s burgeoning winemaking industry will benefit from new research to assess climate change's impacts on Cornwall’s vineyards.

Bees able to spot which flowers offer best rewards before landing

Bumblebees are able to connect differences in pollen quality with floral features, like petal colour, and so land only on the flowers that offer the best rewards, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Exeter.

Noise pollution impacts fish species differently

Acoustic disturbance has different effects on different species of fish, according to a new study from the Universities of Exeter and Bristol which tested fish anti-predator behaviour.

Science could help Cornwall lead the world in sustainable lobster fishing

Biologists from the University of Exeter’s Environment and Sustainability Institute at the Penryn Campus are assessing the impact of the National Lobster Hatchery’s activities on wild lobsters around Cornwall’s coast.

Business and bees could benefit from new research

Researchers from the University of Exeter’s Environment and Sustainability Institute (ESI) are collaborating with Cornwall’s leading vegetable growing company to increase its courgette yields by understanding more about how bees and other insects pollinate the plants.

Early warning system predicts dengue fever risk during the Brazil World Cup

University of Exeter scientists have helped develop an early-warning system to predict the risk of dengue fever outbreaks in Brazil during the forthcoming World Cup.

Virtual bees help to unravel complex causes of colony decline

Scientists have created an ingenious computer model that simulates a honey bee colony over the course of several years.

Managed honeybees linked to new diseases in wild bees

Diseases that are common in managed honeybee colonies are now widespread in the UK’s wild bumblebees, according to research published in Nature.

Spread of crop pests threatens global food security as Earth warms

A new study has revealed that global warming is resulting in the spread of crop pests towards the North and South Poles at a rate of nearly 3 km a year. 

Study investigates extraordinary trout with tolerance to heavily polluted water

New research from the University of Exeter and King’s College London has shown how a population of brown trout can survive in the contaminated waters of the River Hayle in Cornwall.

Ship noise impairs feeding and heightens predation risk for crabs

A study published in the journal Animal Behaviour found that the noise of passing ships disrupts feeding for the common shore crab. 

Boat noise stops fish finding home

Boat noise disrupts orientation behaviour in larval coral reef fish, according to new research from the Universities of Exeter, Bristol and Liège.

Study reveals significant leakage of carbon stored on land to rivers, lakes, estuaries and coastal regions

When carbon is emitted by human activities into the atmosphere it is generally thought that about half remains in the atmosphere and the remainder is stored in the oceans and on land. 

Scientists pave the way for vaccine to combat devastating avian disease

Recent reduction in the use of antibiotic growth promoters in animal feeds has resulted in a dramatic increase in the severe poultry disease - necrotic enteritis. 

Food security expert, Sarah Gurr, gives talk for Research Focus Week

Food security is a global issue which affects us all. From production to supply, feeding a rapidly expanding population requires cutting edge technology and complex logistical networks.

Cardiff joins the Food Security Land Research Alliance

The Food Security Land Research Alliance (FSLRA) today (Friday 10 May 2013) announced that Cardiff University is to join the partnership.

Coral reefs' collapse isn't inevitable, researchers say

Coral reefs are in decline, but their collapse can still be avoided with local and global action.

The Land and Human Wellbeing

Professor Michael Winter gave a presentation at a conference organised by the Joint Rural Issues Group of the Dioceses of Exeter and of Truro, and the Methodist Districts of Cornwall and of Plymouth and Exeter.

Global population expected to be 9 billion in 2050. How will agricultural systems cope?

Professor Michael Winter spoke at Wilton Park's fifth conference in the series 'Global agriculture, food and land use: the international policy challenges'.

Air pollution stunts coral growth

A new study has found that air pollution can shade corals from sunlight and cool the surrounding water resulting in reduced growth rates.

Predicting drought or rainfall in the desert

A new study by Professor Jim Haywood, from Mathematics at the University of Exeter, and colleagues suggests that sporadic volcanic eruptions in the northern hemisphere strongly influence the sea surface temperature and cause drought in the Sahel – the area of sub-Saharan Africa, just south of the Sahara desert. 

Farmer attitudes to environmental management are shaped by a complex set of factors

A Research Report commissioned by Defra has revealed that farmers’ motivations and behaviour in connection with the environment management of their farms are influenced by multiple factors, and that financial inducement is a contributing, but not a sole, factor. 

Symposium is showcase for Centre research

A Symposium was held on 19 November to showcase the current research by staff and PhD students at Exeter University’s Centre for Rural Policy Research.

World-renowned scientist joins food research alliance

Professor Sarah Gurr joins the Food Security and Land Research Alliance between Exeter, Bristol and Rothamsted Research taking up a post based at the University of Exeter and Rothamsted’s North Wyke campus.

Inspiring research to tackle global challenges launched

The University of Exeter is investing £1.5m to ensure that research in the Humanities and Social Sciences helps find innovative solutions to the major global challenges of the 21st century. 

£2 million research boost for Exeter scientists is part of major international push to help the world’s poorest farmers

University of Exeter scientists have received a £2 million boost to their efforts to tackle crop diseases that affect farmers globally – from Sub Saharan Africa to South West England.

Dairy cows' health and productivity set to benefit from Exeter study

University of Exeter scientists are undertaking the first ever study of its kind to investigate how the way dairy cows interact with one another impacts on their health and productivity.

New research shows agri-environment schemes improved by training

A research programme exploring the effectiveness and value for money of agri-environment schemes found that a relatively small amount of training for farmers could significantly improve their environmental outcome.

UFAW Medals awarded to outstanding animal welfare scientists

The 2012 winners of the Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW) Medal for Outstanding Contributions to Animal Welfare Science were announced at the Federation’s Conference Recent Advances in Animal Welfare Science held in York in June.

University of Exeter research uncovers rice blast infection mechanism

Scientists at the University of Exeter have made a new discovery that they hope might lead to effective control of rice blast disease.

Eat less meat and improve farming efficiency to tackle climate change

We need to eat less meat and recycle our waste to rebalance the global carbon cycle and reduce our risk of dangerous levels of climate change

South West food security research boosted by 'globally unique' farm facility

Ambitions to make the South West of England a centre of global significance in the arena of food security and land research have been boosted thanks to a state-of-the-art farm research facility in North Devon.

International research team unravels origin of devastating kiwifruit disease

An international research team including an Exeter scientist has used the latest DNA sequencing technology to trace a devastating pathogen back to its likely origin of China.

New paper on wheat discusses importance of academic and industrial collaboration

By closely integrated working the UK has put itself in the best possible position to deliver the required future yields and hence make a significant contribution to global food security.

Dig for Victory or work together in a common cause? Michael Winter presents some food security challenges to the Women’s Food & Farming Union Conference on 12 April 2012

Professor Michael Winter is an invited speaker at this year’s Annual Conference of  the Women’s Food & Farming Union at Bicton College in Devon.

800-year-old farmers could teach us how to protect the Amazon

In the face of mass deforestation of the Amazon, we could learn from its earliest inhabitants who managed their farmland sustainably.

Ethical Issues in Agriculture - workshop is a success

Professor Michael Winter participated in an EGENIS Workshop at Exeter University on Ethical Issues in Agriculture: Genetically Modified Crops and the Organic Movement.

South West researchers awarded £4.2m to improve our understanding of life on Earth

A new partnership, announced by the Minister for Universities and Science, David Willetts, aims to establish the South West of England as a centre for international excellence in training for bioscience and food security research.

Exeter research highlights importance of Cornwall's food and drink industry

Research on the agriculture and food and drink of Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly confirms just how vital these industries are to the area

Research shows high food inflation mean poorest families hardest hit this Christmas

High food prices are driving overall inflation in the UK and hitting the pockets of the poorest in the country hardest over the Christmas period, research from the University of Exeter Business School and Nottingham University has shown.

UK scientists come together to help feed the 7 billion

The Universities of Exeter and Bristol, in partnership with Rothamsted Research have officially joined forces to tackle one of the biggest challenges facing humanity: how can we sustainably feed a growing population?

Exeter scientists grow plants with friendly fungi

The lack of rainfall and higher-than-average temperatures in spring 2011 were predicted to hit harvests, leading to higher food prices.

UK scientists tackle food security

The Universities of Exeter and Bristol, in partnership with Rothamsted Research are joining forces to tackle one of the biggest challenges facing humanity: how can we feed a growing population?

University of Exeter academic leads €1 million research project on food prices

Professor Steve McCorriston from the University of Exeter Business School will be leading a €1 million research project on factors determining food prices throughout the EU.

Breeding oilseed rape varieties for pollinator-friendly traits

Amounts and sugar content of nectar vary between commercial varieties of oilseed rape (OSR) produced with different breeding systems, when tested in the glasshouse. 

Scientists reveal core genes involved in honey bee immunity

An international team of researchers has identified a core set of genes involved in the responses of honey bees to multiple diseases caused by viruses and parasites.

University of Exeter expert urges Government to implement new laws to protect the environment

Progress on the Government’s long term plan for the environment is too slow and politicians should act more quickly to safeguard our natural resources, a University of Exeter expert has said.

Role of terrestrial biosphere in counteracting climate change may have been underestimated

Research suggests the capacity of the terrestrial biosphere to absorb carbon dioxide may have been underestimated in past calculations due to certain land-use changes not being fully taken into account.